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to the pressing economic deadline facing the united states, which has global implications. the fiscal cliff, a combination of tax increases and spending cuts. right now there is a political standoff, which the head of the imf, christine largarde, has a duty to stop. >> the fiscal cliff -- when you talk to people around the world, how concerned are they about the ramifications of americans going over this cliff? >> people around the world are concerned about it. it used to be the case that they were more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed. they often ask about it and its resolution. >> what do you think the impact could be globally? we're looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> the u.s. is about 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of the fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth, it is going to have repercussions around the world. if the u.s. economy has two% less growth, it will probably be a 1% less growth in mexico, canada, in europe, and japan. there will be ripple effects. >> are you worrie
spending. the fiscal cliff will result in tax increases and federal spenng cuts. >> both parties are kind of, hey, i'm going to do my thing, you're going to do your thing, nobody seems to want to give in. >> many shoppers agree, as tax paying citizens, one of the top things on their wish list for christmas is for the president and congress to compromise and to get a deal done. >> please start working together and remember the people who put you in office. >> nadia ramdass, wbal-tv 11 news. >> jews around the world celebrated the beginning of hanukkah saturday night. in chicago, hundreds gathered to watch the lighting of an overicized menorah. hanukkah commemorates the jewish uprising in the second century b.c. according to tradition, when the jews dedicated the temple in jerusalem, a single vial of oil burned for eight days. and some people celebrated hanukkah with a dance party. creative alliance hosted a party with music, dancing and singing. >> tonight is first night of hanukkah, the celebration that brings light into the darkness and we celebrate freedom and liberation movements and r
lead time. but it's also important to remember that the fiscal cliff isn't only tax rates and spending cuts. the fiscal cliff also includes the nation's agriculture policy, which expires at the end of the year. it includes patches to medicare formulas. patches to social security formulas. so this is a huge mess of issues. we're not even talking about those issues yet. congressional negotiators and the white house aren't talking about these huge host of other issues that are on the table. the thought is if they can get past tax rates and spending cuts, then they will be able to deal with the peripheral issues. but we don't have much time. if a deal isn't reached or a framework isn't reached in the next week or, so it's going to be a big problem. >> all right, thanks for that. good to see you. > >>> nokia -- we'll tell you more when we come back in a few moments. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to rememb
the fiscal cliff? does it factor into their spending efforts? >> not really. that's a great question. and the answer is no, not really. what i think really is happening with the michigan numbers and the sentiment numbers is a little bit of optimism that followed on the back of the election process. and then it's settling back in that nothing's going to change. nothing is going to get better. nothing's happening in washington. there is no movement towards consensus on either side of the debate. people look at that and say what were we so optimistic about? i think the cliff will be more of an effect afterwards. but to go back to stewart's point, he's talking about 2% growth in spending. 2% consumer growth is probably going to produce a very weak gdp number. although we had a nice number on the boost, we'll have a horrible in the next quarter. which isn't great. that's really the point. 11% rise in fedex sales not going to lead in an 11%? consumer spending. at beast we're looking at 2%. that's not good. >> my 2% forecast is for next year. i think we'll do better this quarter. and you do
with no agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff. economists warn that if higher taxes and less government spending go into effect for many months next year, the u.s. could sink back into recession. so expect reporter questions on that topic at the fed's question and answer session after the policy announcement. >> he's going to reiterate to politicians to get their acts together for some sort of long-term deficit reduction plan. >> reporter: the stock market often rises when the fed announces economic stulus measures. but that may not happen tomorrow. some experts think the overhang of the fiscal cliff will likely dampen investor enthusiasm. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: the latest economic statistics the federal reserve can consider is the october trade balance, with american importing a record amount of stuff from china. that increased our trade deficit to $42.2 billion. u.s. exports fell 3.6%, the biggest drop in almost four years. imports also fell, down 2.1% to the lowe in month n ll street,he dow gained 78, the nasdaq rose 44, the s& up nine. >> susie: our next guest says the fed's stim
is enough to get us past the fiscal cliff, turn off these automatic spending cuts and make sure that taxes don't go up. and then they would figure out what to do with the upper bracket. and then there would be a mechanism that would guarantee further action next year. if at all possible, they would disagree next year and there would be some sort of trigger or punishment for their lack of action. that sounds relatively simple, i think, putting it all together could take at least a couple of weeks after they have a deal. there could be some inevitable blocks either by conservatives in the house or in the senate. blowups either byow wha conservatives in the house or in the senate. the details can get pretty political party quickly. there's so much in flux. it all presupposes that the get an agreement. there was a school of thought that they could not get an agreement until tax rates actually go up next year. >> you can follow himat @apandrewtaylor. >> a discussion on the u.s. economy and you pull in the middle class with participants from think tanks, academia and business at 8:30 a.m. easter
on the spending cuts. walmart's ceo mike duke expressed concerns about the fiscal cliff. >> the week before the election, only one-fourth, 25% of our core customers even knew what fiscal cliff meant. okay? one week after the election, it was up to 75%. now these same customers, 15% of our customers are telling us, this discussion about fiscal cliff will affect what they spend on christmas. >> that's a fascinating read on -- >> i wonder who's doing the surveying? how is that occurring? >> greeters? >> i would be curious how they know those percentages. do they ask people at the -- >> yeah. >> and can you define the fiscal cliff? i don't mean to question the methodology, it's interesting. >> just curious. >> i think that when i was in washington, i got the sense that there were just a lot of people there who actually thought romney was going to win. and there would be no fiscal cliff because romney would get together with congress, extend every single tax break and we would all live happily ever after and not worry about the deficit and not worry about the 2%. there was a kind of, well, they
and not spending cuts in averting the fiscal cliff. >> the facts are at that point the 39.6% does produce the revenue. the differentiation between 39.6% and the 28% at that the president has for limitation on deduction creates a great deal of money as well. >> one conservative financial commentator suggests the likely outcome of the fiscal cliff talks won't be the end of the world. >> we will have taxes that are the same as the taxes were under bill clinton. we did find that we will do fine. >> the question is whether the negotiations will lead to making other tough choices such as washington getting a handle on the growth of government. if not, the european example seems to suggest fiscal trouble to our shores as well. >> john: thanks. the stock were mixed. dow gained 81. s&p 500 up 4. president obama visits detroit and he will see upset people there. mike tobin has the effect. >> michigan democrats say they can't stop, as the republicans have the numbers so despite the angry protests the legislation that rick schneider calls freedom to work will pass the final vote on tuesday. we have h
up fiscal cliff, we're now seeing house speaker boehner discussing the issue from the house floor. the first time he's commented publicly after meeting with president obama sunday. let's listen. >>> right flonow the american people have to be wondering when is the president going to get serious. i yield back. >> the chair recognizes the gentlemen from pennsylvania mr. altmire, for five minutes. >> i rise to recognize victor decarlo for receiving the -- >> we have been listening to the house speaker talking about negotiations taking place with the president obviously, a lot of people watching closely, trying to avoid the fiscal cliff which would mean tax hikes for almost all americans but also severe cuts as well. they are debating that publicly as well as privately. i want to talk more about the rebel group that we had mention before in syria, that is now designated a new terrorist organization, cnn's hala gorani joining us atlanta. hala, first of all, you've got the syrian rebels, they're there fighting al assad's government. now the u.s. government, state department, steps in an
and not spending cuts in averting the fiscal cliff. >> the facts are that at this point the 39.6% does produce the revenue. the differentiation between the 39 pin 6% and the 28% that the president has for limitation or deductions creates a great deal of money as well. >> one conservative commentator suggested the out come of the fiscal talks won't be the end of the world. >> we will have taxes which are roughly the same as they were underon. we did fine in that. we will do fine. >> the question is whether these negotiations will lead to making other tough choices such as washington getting a handle on the growth of government. if not the european example seems to suggest huge fiscal trouble coming to our shores as well. mike emmanuel, fox news. >>> here is a doozie of a story. a baby mix up at a minneapolis hospital results in a new mother breastfeeding another woman's baby. i told you it was a doozie. the woman given the wrong infant realized that something was not right. >> when they brought cody she thought to herself it didn't look like her other baby. but her husband reassured her, and sh
about the fiscal cliff and 15% say it means they will spend less on christmas. it's pre-telling, right? >> apparently the walmart shopper is more informed than the average american. we showed 70%. that's out there. it's something that affects people. it was clear in the data there was an effect of the fiscal cliff on overall economic attitudes. the more important thing we found is that it affects businesses and businesses slow down in capital spending. you're an economic student and you know the connection between company spending to buy big capital goods, buy machinery and hiring the thing everybody wants to have happen in this country. the other thing interesting in the fed survey yesterday, michelle, 41% say we are going to go over. 46% say no. 13% aren't sure. personally, i add the -- people think we're going over the cliff to those who aren't sure, i come up with 54%. more than half of the people think it will either happen or uncertain if they're going to happen and both lead to a lousy outcome of uncertainty and holding back. >> good point. thank you. >> cnbc's coverage begins 1
to some sort of agreement on the fiscal cliff. we can't increase spending. we are trying to rein it in and i am not that worried. there are distributional effects. lot of the lower end retailers, dollars or, drug stores have been big beneficiaries on extended unemployment benefits and their business will likely slow. cheryl: let me ask you something. you brought up the issue of the amount of retail dobbs but those are low-wage jobs. i assume the market does not want to see that. nice to see jobs added but not the right type of jobs. >> that is right. 50% of the jobs that were part of today's report of the low-income variety jobs. hospitality, leisure, retail, temporary jobs. we don't want to see that on wall street. we want to see the high-wage jobs because those are the jobs that will sustain a growing economy. they will be able to buy big-ticket items such as cars, a house, durable-goods. that is what you need to really grow this economy and right now we haven't heard any strategy of washington. all we're hearing about are extra taxes. cheryl: i want you to listen to this and
on this fiscal cliff which has automatic tax hikes and spending cuts as of january one, they are trying to avert that. he says any deal on this must include an end to the debt ceiling all together. he wants complete power to raise the country's limit by himself. he doesn't want to have to get congressional approval. that is a demand stirring strong response from republicans today. >> the on way we ever cut spending is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that spur to cut all together. of course, it gets in the way of his spending plans. i can assure you it one happen. the american people want washington to get spending under control and the debt limit is the best tool we have to make the president take that demand seriously. the american people want us to fight to cut spending. it's a fight they deserve and a fight we are happy to have. >> joining me now, simon rosenberg. and mark theisen. guys, welcome. simon, let me start with you on this. we did have some democrats come on the show and say no, the president doesn't get to just decide when to rais
is obvious to the most casual observer is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar of spending cuts, yet the president wants more revenue and fewer spending cuts. if we fell off the cliff, his plan calls for another round of stimulus spending. you have got to be kidding me. lackshe president's plan is any reform in our entitlement system. the unrestrained growth in entitlement system is driving deficits and driving the debt even higher than the percentage of our gdp. it is estimated to be as high as $128 trillion. even if they confiscate all of the income that excesses $1 million, we cannot pay for the entitlement commitments that the federal government has made. we have made promises to ourselves that we simply cannot keep. without some sensible entitlement reform, our credit rating will be downgraded again. we will become a country that none of us recognize. secondly, fiscal plans failed to achieve their government budget deficit or debt reduction goals. dr. hassett has examined fiscal plans in
. tell me about energy policy and where it fits in with the fiscal cliff. what we will spend money on and how we were tightened our belts. >> the major place it fits is the right policy would create an environment which would produce a lot more revenue. that would help to reduce the debt. the federal government doesn't spend much money on energy. energy research is about $6 billion a year. i would like to see it doubled. this report is a blueprint for independence and i think it is the right blueprint. we are not in a position to be held hostage by anybody. it also focuses on find more and use less. what we can do in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe a
and lawmakers in washington continue to push america's economy toward a fiscal cliff. both sides promising to cut trillions in government spending over the next decade but republicans insist it could be done without raising taxes on the rich. president obama ib cysts it's a nonstarter. it's a mess. no one can argue that. what happens if there is no deal? are we, as some argue, making too much of the fiscal cliff deadline? would it be a catastrophe to hit it, go over it? maybe for a while. joining me from london, the host of quest means business on cnn international. i have 60 seconds to set you straight on this. i'll go first. [ bell ringing ] all right. it could be catastrophic if congress doesn't get a deal by january 1. the government will try to soften the blow of spending cuts and tax increases. they could delay the withholdings that people pay though tax rates are going up or they could tell agencies to accelerate the spending at the new year to mitigate cuts that are coming. that assumes congress will do something. otherwise it could be catastrophic. i say, don't count on it. if a d
the fiscal cliff. in 22 days we go over that edge. that's when sweeping tax hikes and spending cuts kick in unless a deal gets done. after 23 days without uttering a word to each other face-to-face, that is, president obama and house speaker john boehner sat down at the white house yesterday. they talked. so let's bring in brianna keilarment she is live in washington. so congress is scheduled to break for the holidays later this week. where do we go from here? how are these talks? >> we don't know. that's the thing. we know they spoke. in fact, it's somewhat remarkable that both the white house and speaker boehner's office put out statements simply saying that the two men had spoken. the lines of communication are open. and they were the same verbatim. that is something you can look at as some progress, perhaps. certainly it is promising may be the better way to put it. there is coordination there. they seem to be talking in good faith, trying to keep, i guess, their cards very close to the vest. and that is something that maybe is seen as promising. again, there is no word on actual pro
it comes to the fiscal cliff crisis. because in just 22 days americans face severe tax hikes and spending cuts unless these two leaders can find a way to compromise. now neither side would discuss specifics about their conversation. but after yesterday's white house meeting, a spokesman for the president said "the lines of communication remain open." now that may be music to the ears of former white house chief of staff erskine bowles, one half of the bowles-simpson reduction duo. >> they started a tango now. you know, any time you got two guys in there tangoing, you have a chance to get it done. >> brianna keilar is live now from washington. we don't have a lot of details about what went on in that meeting. maybe if they're both not talking, that may be a good thing. >> that's right. in fact, we have almost absolutely no details. the things that really interesting, though, to observers here is the statement that came out from the white house and from the speaker's office. they're the same statement verbatim. they're not leaking details. and that's something that you may see as possibly a
will be raising taxes. we will be cutting spending. you say that even if we go over the fiscal cliff, you do not think the markets will "fall out of bed." clearly, there is some volatility there. >> i lose sleep at night on a number of things. i do not lose that much sleep that night and having the fiscal cliff go into 2013. quite honestly, and, i think i'll falling off the cliff is probably the wrong metaphor, what it ultimately does is takes hot water and turns on the heat. we are sitting in the water. the clock will be taking. we need it resolved. the longer it is not resolved the more of an effect it will have on our economy. if they ultimately come up with an agreement sometime mid-january, i don't think there is any harm. tracy: where you put your money? can you pick a sector real quick for us? >> sure. i would say income. perhaps utilities. utilities is a good example. for the first time in a long time, utilities are yielding more than high-quality corporate bonds. we are at near record levels. ashley: thank you so much for joining us. tracy: if they do not fiscal fiscal cliff housing
that you think that going over the fiscal cliff is in president obama's best interest. >> i really believe that. frankly, the lack of credible solutions and backtracking like the amount of spending. doubling the taxes he wants raised and the fact he wants stimulus package that he knew nobody was going to support here. doesn't look like he's trying to engage in ernest discussions, which leads me to believe he wants us to go over the cliff and be able to blame the republicans and maybe it's more about politics. >> congress people themselves said the election was a referendum on the president's ideas. part of that was the very clear message of tax hikes on the top 2%. >> that's great, but he didn't win my district and i did. so my mandate is something else. >> good appoint. >> if we only represent our own slices we'll never get anything done. >> you hit the nail on the head. what we're being asked is the republican conference, jump off the cliff alone. if this is going to be a deal, we've got to grab hands together and jump off together. they have got to put the long-term obligations on the t
in the fiscal cliff crisis. it's getting quiet on capitol hill. 21 days remain before the tax hikes and spending cuts kick in, and congress breaks for the holiday, at least they are scheduled to, on friday. this is what you need to know. the president on the road pitching his tax plan to workers at a truck plant in michigan. house speaker boehner were conducting behind the scenes talks with the white house. and the posturing and finger pointing in washington suddenly stopped. we have more from washington. the sounds of silence may be the sounds of progress? >> potentially. we hope so. we don't really know. we're forced to read the tea leaves essentially, john, because neither side is giving details about the substance of discussions. let me read a statement from john boehner's press secretary. "discussions with the white house are taking place, but we have no detail to share about the substance of those conversations. the republican offer made last week remains the republican offer and we continue to wait for the president to identify the spending cuts he's willing to make as part of the balance
past the fiscal cliff, use automatic spending cuts to make sure taxes don't go up, at least on the great majority and then figure out what to do about the upper brackets, and if that is -- that would be a mechanism that would guarantee further action next year and as is very well possible they would disagree next year and there would be some sort of trigger or punishment for their lack of action. that sounds relatively simple, putting it all together could take at least a couple weeks after you have a deal, there could be some inevitable blow ups from conservatives in the house for the senate so a lot of it is speculation. secondly, a lot of of things that might go in this down payment, farm subsidy cuts, there is a proposal to make federal retirees--federal workers pay more towards their retirement, that can get pretty political pretty quickly. it is very much in flux. all of that presupposes they get an agreement. there is a school of thought that they can't get an agreement until after tax rates actually go. >> host: andrew taylor is with the associated press. does the yo
to listen in a little more to see what he has to say about the fiscal cliff and otherwise. >> entirely on spending cuts, or a variation that has emerged is that we can do so while still lowering rates by closing loopholes and deductions. and you've heard from my team but let me just repeat. we don't have any objection to tax reform, tax simplification. closing loopholes, closing deductions, but there is a bottom line, an amount of revenue that is required in order for us to get a real, meaningful deficit reduction plan that hits the numbers that are required for us to stabilize our debt and deficits. and -- [. [no audio] kwroe. jenna: we gave it our best shot. sometimes we can't do it. the president speaking at the white house at the business roundtable about the economy. fiscal cliff certainly the issue in the short term for a lot of big businesses and certainly for a lot of american taxpayers. however, long term is another story when it comes to the economy, and entitlements, the president referring to that as well. as we continue to get that feedback you can check it out foxnews.com
indicate that companies have been reacting to the fiscal cliff by pulling back on spending or hiring. why haven't we seen that show up in the jobs report? is there a concern that we might see more of a pullback into next year? >> i think that's exactly what this survey is saying. about 50% have already taken some action. i think companies right now are waiting to see what's going to happen and it really comes down to two major issues. if we can get this fiscal cliff issue resolved, then we are looking at a pretty optimismic outlook from our members. but if we don't get the fiscal cliff, almost 60% said they'll be looking at cutting jobs and/or layoffs. >> cfos are notoriously less sang win than ceos. it's not particularly surprising that this group is expressing some contingency plans. but on average, they expect the u.s. to add of a million jobs next year. so kind of a divide here between the view that on the other hand things are getting better and on the other hand there's a big uncertainty out there still. >> i think finance people always want to balance the book and ceos tend to be m
have had to report on the posturing and talking point known as the fiscal cliff. decisions about taxes and spending are extremely important especially when we are adding $300 billion a day to our debt but the constant bickering of dueling politicians on both sides of the aisle, the endless kicking of the can, the brinkmanship as we approach that disaster is making all americans angry. i think you turned off and tuned out and i don't blame you. who can sit still and watch our country dragged into ruinous-and not be a little frustrated? as i said many times i came here from europe 40 years ago and instantly felt the warm embrace of a truly generous and free society and now i see america galloping down the european road. we have already reached european levels of debt and our leaders give as political pablum. we deserve better than this. the other night i left the fiscal cliff behind and took a walk through new york city. it was great. the lights, the christmas tree, rockefeller center, crowds of people with their children. was such a switch. "varney and company" will not walk away from t
in mandatory across-the-board spending cuts over one year, to drag our nation over the so-called fiscal cliff. what those tax increases mean to an average american family of four earning $50,000 a year is over $2,000 in higher income taxes. add to that expiration of the alternative minimum tax patch, new taxes mandated by the federal health care bill, and the reinstatement of the death tax, which will impact the next generation of farmers, ranchers, and small business owners, which americans will see the largest tax increase in the history of our country. if all of this happens, the congressional budget office predicts the nation's economy will shrink next year and the unemployment rate could rise again. in other words, we go back into recession. i believe we can avoid the fiscal cliff and address our massive deficit but that requires doing three essential things: reforming our tax code, reforming entitlement programs, and better controlling our spending. we can get additional revenue by reforming our tax code. that means closing loopholes and limiting deductions. by closing loopholes and lim
in washington. speak up for the fiscal cliff is part of the half trillion dollars in cuts to the pentagon. the defense has been saying we will not plan for sequestration's because they don't want to be cautious because it is like a gun to the head. they're now looking into planning for this because we are getting pretty late, and that may become a reality. back to you. melissa: rich edson, thank you so much. lori: let's continue this discussion. it is going to happen, it is exactly what the democrats want. according to scott hodge of the tax foundation. what are some alternatives to raising revenue? joining me with some ideas. to your point, you're written quite extensively on this topic. it seems the economy is poised to fall off the cliff and that's what the democrats and the president wants to happen. >> they want to allow all the bush tax cuts to expire. it happens naturally automatically. they don't even have to vote for it. in january we had to lower taxes for everybody. getting it very simply. lori: a lot of people are concerned. if we do go over the cliff, there's no resolution fo
of sense. yet, here we are on the edge of this fiscal cliff. we're not sure what will happen. many people predicting we'll go over the cliff. if we go over the cliff and the automatic spending cuts take effect and the tax increases take effect, what do you think happens to the economy? >> well, at the brt meeting that you mentioned, where the president was nice enough to come over, the question was asked, if we go over the fiscal cliff, how many businesses in this room will reduce capital investment? remember, i just said -- and it's very demonstrable that capital investment is what drives gdp growth rate and job creation. that tells a story right there. if we go across the fiscal cliff, we will have an economic contraction or slow down at best. >> how are things looking right now ahead of the holidays? i'm sure your company is real busy, fedexing gifts. what are your expectations for this holiday season? >> well, you know, the 300,000 wonderful teammates of fedex are working very hard. we publicly forecast a couple weeks ago that on the 10th we would move 19 million shipments through our
than $600 billion in tax increases and spending cuts kick in. the fiscal cliff potentially sending the economy into recession. the fear of the cliff. is that putting a veil over your eyes and pretending you seeing good news that could make better trades for your portfolio? you need to see the forest for the trees. to help do that, liz saunders in a fox business exclusive, charles schwab's vice president and chief investment strategist. what is the biggest mistake that the investor is making right now as it pertains to navigating that very rocky fiscal cliff landscape? >> they are trying to trade around perceived outcomes. that is fairly treacherous. we don't get a sense that a lot of investors are doing that -- [talking over each other] liz: there were buying in on the dips because they are trading around he headlines. >> there's a lot of tax related strategy happening right now, many of which make a lot of sense, but i have asked the question of loss, what would you put money on a particular outcome? i wouldn't. that is a dangerous strategy. >> one scenario could be as damaging a
is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar of spending cuts, yet the president wants more revenue and fewer spending cuts. if we fell off the cliff, his plan calls for another round of stimulus spending. you have got to be kidding me. what the president's plan lacks is any reform in our entitlement system. the unrestrained growth in entitlement system is driving deficits and driving the debt even higher than the percentage of our gdp. it is estimated to be as high as $128 trillion. even if they confiscate all of the income that excesses $1 million, we cannot pay for the entitlement commitments that the federal government has made. we have made promises to ourselves that we simply cannot keep. without some sensible entitlement reform, our credit rating will be downgraded again. we will become a country that none of us recognize. secondly, fiscal plans failed to achieve their government budget deficit or debt reduction goals. dr. hassett has examined fiscal plans in other countries. on average, unsu
to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff at the end of this month. a series of tax cuts and spending cuts set to kick in just 26 shopping days until the fiscal cliff. >> brian: less working days. >> steve: that's right. house republicans say there will be no deal if tax ritz go up and the obama administration says it's ready to go thelma and louise style over the cliff on january 1. if that's the case, wendell goler live at the white house with what we know is going on behind the scenes. anything happening? >> steve, the president and house speaker john boehner talked on the phone yesterday, but they agreed not to characterize their conversation. so it's unclear how much progress they made. from the outside, it does seem they've moved a bit closer with boehner now agreeing to raise tax collection from the wealthy, though not by raising tax rates. >> we've got to cut spending and i believe to put revenues on the table. the revenues we're putting on the table will come from, guess who, the rich! there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes, and have the same people pay more of their mone
anything done. the fiscal cliff hits. the arguments i just pa about the withholding tables and cutting spending, are not generally talked about. a lot of people deny they can be done. we're confident they can. so the question then becomes what's the impact, where is the impact. and the impact is equity markets end of next week will say these guys aren't going to get it done, we won't have a deal january 1, everything falls apart, that's assuming of course we all get past december 21st. >> so basically week and counting before you think the equity market really drops significantly? >> if we do get a deal done do, we just maintain the 2% that we're stuck in with the high unemployment and not go down? or does it actually allow us to start growing again? is anybody talking growth? >> we're talking growth. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes
. ♪ host: we will spend about two hours this morning on the "washington journal" talking about the fiscal cliff. we want to start off hearing from you on a different topic. what do you think about hillary clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we have lots of facebook comments already on this question. we want to share a couple of those with thieu. jackie
, 15% of our customers are telling us this discussion about fiscal cliff will affect what they spend on christmas. >> and most americans aren't close to finished with holiday shopping yet. giving retailers a hope for a big boost in the last few weeks beforesom christmas. 58% of those surveyed said they completed half or less of their holiday shopping so far. i've got a little guilt on that front. >>> joining us for more, global ceo of sanrio. welcome. waving to the world there. >> yes. >> happy holiday. >> wearing your brand, as well. >> happy holiday from mr. mann. >> we should point out that mr. men is a key part of your strategy which is changing, is it not? >> exactly. last year we started to did mergers. this is our first acquisition, international acquisition. >> which is buying the company that owns -- people may have seen these in book stores -- the little miss sunshine and little -- what's the male equivalent? >> yes. there's little miss series and mr. man series both. >> yeah. >> total over 60 characters. >> why buy that? what are you going do? >> we need portfolio. hello k
in the fiscal cliff talks? if they do not get the money from unemployment insurance. the jobs do not exist in the private sector to take on, then they spend less. that is bad for the economy. extending the programs would benefits. that is because the money trickles through the system. spent on food, housing, he teen, all of the basic necessities that give us a multiplier effect. host: this is from the national employment law project. who will be affected if the program ends. insurance will be cut off after payments for the week ended december 29. unemployment benefits without access to the euc by the end of the first quarter of 2013. tickets for those numbers a little bit and specifically the guest: there are two fundamental programs part of the extension. the important thing about them, this is what really counts in this, they provide the additional benefits passed the six months the market. additional benefits, they are possibly forced onto other kind of government programs like welfare. that is one important consideration to make. over the course of the year, as many as 10 million ameri
as the fiscal cliff take effect. bloomberg government hosted a discussion this morning with the top democrat on the house budget committee, chris van hollen as well as republican senator bob corker and senator mark warner. at 9:00 eastern, president obama and house spear jaub boehner and spoke about the fiscal cliff today. republicans might be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy in january. house speaker calling on the obama administration to respond to the republicans' deficit proposal. president obama is at 9:00 eastern followed by speaker boehner. >> this weekend on c-span 3's american history tv, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to japan. >> everybody has their own view what happened and i don't want to argue survival to anyone in japan about the history. we're past that. and my whole purpose for being here is to listen to the living and to do what i can. >> sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 i believe and going to say that is precedent. and indiana had a -- >> they decided on the in
the country back from the fiscal cliff. he spoke to workers at a auto engine plant. he said lawmakers need to make some tough spending cuts on things we don't need. but he said he is determined to keep tax breaks in place for the middle class while raising taxes for higher earning americans. >> i won't compromise on. i am not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me get to keep all our tax breaks and we are asking students to pay higher student los. >> republicans insist cuts to entitlement programs should be on the table. they must act before december 31 to avoid the fiscal cliff. >>> on wall street today, the dow is up 14 to 13,169. the nasdaq is up 8 at 2,986. the s&p is up 0.48 at 1,418. >>> the pentagon identified a navy s.e.a.l. killed over the weekend while rescuing a doctor held captive in afghanistan. he died during the raid. it freed the doctor who was working for a colorado based organization when he was taken captive. he was part of the same group that carried out the raid that killed osama bin laden. >>> two disk jockeys made an amallagy
's advertisers are displaying caution about spending because of the fiscal cliff. he'll be on "squawk on the street" at 11:40 eastern time. and netflix paying for exclusive rights to stream disney movies. a lot of happenings moving stocks in a big way. with pandora, analysts give pandora a pass but they keep putting out bright spots in third quarter that did come in better than expected. mobile monthization. >> this is the first company that came out and blamed the fiscal cliff. one of the few companies that would not be worried about the fiscal cliff because of great growth opportunities. could this be a competitive thing? >> i use them both. a huge fan of both. jpmorgan says it doesn't change the thesis. the theme is that they, like others, monthization and mobile continues to do well and you get guidance and morgan says it's frustrating. >> guidance was terrible. another disaster. it may be too early to buy pandora to put it in zynga groupon. groupon, i don't know if you call the deal today. it's awesome. one of three different i can do. >> you can get two in one day. >> i don't kn
the conversation over to the spending cuts and the fiscal cliff negotiations. two questions on that. one is, does that suggest that there is movement, so we're no longer talking about tax cuts or tax increases? and where is the administration, i know you guys have argued back that they have provided details on spending cuts, but are you prepared to offer more? today you have a letter from c.b.o.'s urging that spending cuts, entitlement adjustments and so forth be a multiple, a greater multiple than revenues. is the white house prepared to do more on that front? >> let me take your questions in relative order. first of all, i did hear what the speaker of the house had to say. and i would note that if there is one fact that should not be in dispute it ought to be this, the president, unlike any other party to these negotiations, has put forward detailed spending cuts as well as detailed revenue proposals. it is a simple fact that the president put those forward to the nat so super supercommittee in september of 2011. and that he again in the process of these negotiations put them forward as his pos
, he's not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and he's clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. >> reporter: while democrats and republicans debate the size and specifics on tax increases, the two sides also remain apart on spending cuts, reforming entitlement programs like medicare and on the president's request to have greater power to raise the country's debt limit. but the news coming out of this one, "wall street journal" headlines saying that staff members from the president's team and from speaker boehner's team are genre assuming talks. we confirmed as of a couple of hours hag that that wasn't the case, so we're going to check on that right now. david: what they're talking about, we don't know. liz: maybe not dead in the water. david: thank you, rich, appreciate it. liz: we've got good news for all of you last minute shoppers out there coming up in the speed read. david: and up next, first on fox business, tom kloet, ceo of tmx group, a parent of the toronto stock exchange, on the impact of all these regulations coming out of our country. how wil
, president obama and house speaker boehner spending a sunday together to talk about the fiscal cliff. no word on any progress and the president will be in detroit today to speak about the economy. joining us right now is cnbc's chief washington correspondent john harwood. john, you had a great column over the weekend in the in, times whether you took a look back at what happened in 1990 where things were set up for a grit debate but maybe things were easier at that point because you didn't have the 24-hour news cycle. you had other things that made it easier the last time around. what does that lead us to think this time around? >> well, there are ways in which it was more difficult, as you just alluded to, becky. but there are a lot of similarities, too. there are warnings that the economy is going to take a huge hit if a multi year budget deal was not enacted. you had a republican party led by a president who had made a no tax pledge and who was trying to figure out a way out of that. when he finally did that, that's when the negotiations took on a faster pace. and i do think here the fact
some of wednesday's events regarding the fiscal cliff. tax increases and spending cuts that will go into effect unless congress acts. first, a bloomberg government form. in an hour, president obama speaks to ceo's at a business roundtable. followed by a news conference with john boehner. several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. talking about housing issues and the agency's budget. here on c-span at 10:00 eastern. on c-span two, 9:00 a.m. eastern, a news briefing at the pentagon. also, a senate commerce subcommittee on the impact of hurricane sandy and transportation systems in the northeast, on c-span 3 at 10:30 a.m. eastern. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine but we have not coordinated care. all of these have some in the cracks that they are as harmful as the disease is treated. you have to ask, are we hurting people overall on a global level that's what are we doing sometimes? now we have got the report saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care. when we step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the procedures
slow walk the process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. herhere's what we do know. we know the president wants more stimulus spending and an increase in the debt limit without any cuts for reforms. that is not fixing our problem, frankly, it is making it worse. on top of that, the president wants to raise tax rates on many small-business owners. but even if we did exactly what the president wants, we would see red ink for as far as the eye can see. that is not fixing our problem either, just making it worse. i think the members know i am an optimist. i am hopeful we can reach an agreement. this is a serious issue and there's a lot at stake. the american people sent us here to work together. toward the best possible solution, and that means cutting spending. now if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he has an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the commerce. because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious. >> to some that all up, house republicans hav
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